Astrantia major ‘Hadspen Blood’
Astrantia major L. Apiaceae. Gentleman’s Melancholy, Hattie’s Pincushion, Mountain Sanicle, & Black-root Sanicle. It was called Black Masterwort by Gerard (1633) and Imperatoria by Parkinson (1640), ‘Hadspen Blood’ is a cultivar. Masterwort was cultivated as a pot-herb, recommended by Culpeper (1650) for “cold griefs and diseases both of the stomache and body”. The roots were used as a purgative (Lindley, 1838) and an infusion from the whole plant as a diuretic. The botanical name Astrantia is a corruption of the old apothecaries’ name for this plant, Magistrantia, ‘masterwort’, implying its suitability for use only by adepts in herbalism. Distribution: central and eastern Europe. Parkinson (1640) recommended it for colds, dyspnoea, renal stone, inducing menses and for expelling a dead foetus, hysteria (‘strangulation of the mother’), cramps, heart failure, epilepsy, purulent wounds and ulcers, and ‘reviving the abilitie of generation being almost extinct’ which Parkinson doubted, quartain fevers, colic and for purging the brain. Pommet (1712) gave a completely different list: against poisons, stinking breath, malignant and pestilential diseases, vertigo, apoplexy, palsies, toothache, scabby head, and agrees with its use for ulcers. Not used now, but as it is purgative, in the family Apiaceae, it is likely to be toxic. Photographed in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians, London
Dr Henry Oakeley/Wellcome Images

Dr Henry Oakeley/Wellcome Images


'Early Light' by Graham Colling
Newlands Wood, Cannock, UK
Graham Colling/PA Wire

Graham Colling/PA Wire


سبحان الله على جمال الطبيعة و روعة التصوير 

(via between2sujuds)


إندونيسيا   Taken around Mount Bromo, East Java, Indonesia in the morning. (Photo and caption by Pimpin Nagawan/National Geographic Photo Contest)

إندونيسيا   Taken around Mount Bromo, East Java, Indonesia in the morning. (Photo and caption by Pimpin Nagawan/National Geographic Photo Contest)


Aerial view of the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (Photo and caption by Chris Schmid/National Geographic Photo Contest) #

Aerial view of the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (Photo and caption by Chris Schmid/National Geographic Photo Contest) #


(Nature) An over/under water split level image of beautiful crimson red waratah anemones in a rock pool at low tide. What I really love about over/under photographs is that it gives the underwater element a sense of place. For the viewer it marries the underwater environment with our own familiar world. It links the unknown with the known. (Photo and caption by Matt Smith/National Geographic Photo Contest)
   (Nature) An over/under water split level image of beautiful crimson red waratah anemones in a rock pool at low tide. What I really love about over/under photographs is that it gives the underwater element a sense of place. For the viewer it marries the underwater environment with our own familiar world. It links the unknown with the known. (Photo and caption by Matt Smith/National Geographic Photo Contest)

(Nature) An over/under water split level image of beautiful crimson red waratah anemones in a rock pool at low tide. What I really love about over/under photographs is that it gives the underwater element a sense of place. For the viewer it marries the underwater environment with our own familiar world. It links the unknown with the known. (Photo and caption by Matt Smith/National Geographic Photo Contest)

   (Nature) An over/under water split level image of beautiful crimson red waratah anemones in a rock pool at low tide. What I really love about over/under photographs is that it gives the underwater element a sense of place. For the viewer it marries the underwater environment with our own familiar world. It links the unknown with the known. (Photo and caption by Matt Smith/National Geographic Photo Contest)


سبحان الله

سبحان الله

(via ibn3omar)


"This was my favorite shot from my first afternoon of chasing the Supermoon. This is a five image vertical panorama with each image taken at 800mm. As the sun continued to set, it illuminated these aspen trees beautifully and as the sky gradually darkened, the moon became brighter. I hope to use this technique tonight at the Grand Canyon."
Source

"This was my favorite shot from my first afternoon of chasing the Supermoon. This is a five image vertical panorama with each image taken at 800mm. As the sun continued to set, it illuminated these aspen trees beautifully and as the sky gradually darkened, the moon became brighter. I hope to use this technique tonight at the Grand Canyon."


Source


سبحان الله..هذا خلق الله #غرد_بصورة 

سبحان الله..هذا خلق الله #غرد_بصورة 

(via shooya3ny-deactivated20140816)


WOW Erupting Volcano
areg:

Erupting Volcano

WOW Erupting Volcano

areg:

Erupting Volcano

(via voodoo444)


سبحان الله- كهف الجليد في أيسلاند -راااائع
visitheworld:

Deep blue ice cave at Svínafellsjökull Glacier in Skaftafell, Iceland (by www.lichtjahre.eu).

سبحان الله- كهف الجليد في أيسلاند -راااائع

visitheworld:

Deep blue ice cave at Svínafellsjökull Glacier in Skaftafell, Iceland (by www.lichtjahre.eu).


سبحان الله أبدع الزهور #غرد_بصورة

سبحان الله أبدع الزهور #غرد_بصورة

(via she-is-from-bosnia)


What a wonderful world !
The Mountain, by: TSO Photography


ليست صورة فنية!! The Landsat satellites have been gathering data about Earth for 40 years - the first one was launched in 1972. The images in this gallery have been coloured with a digital palette by the US Geological Survey to highlight certain features. Siberian Ribbons - June 15th, 2005 - Vivid colors and bizarre shapes come together in an image that could be an abstract work of art or an illustration for a fantasy story. This labyrinth of exotic features is present along the edge of Russia’s Chaunskaya Bay (vivid blue half circle) in northeastern Siberia. Two major rivers, the Chaun and Palyavaam, flow into the bay, which in turn opens into the Arctic Ocean. Ribbon lakes and bogs are present throughout the area, created by depressions left by receding glaciers.Picture: USGS/NASA/Landsat / Rex Features

ليست صورة فنية!! The Landsat satellites have been gathering data about Earth for 40 years - the first one was launched in 1972. The images in this gallery have been coloured with a digital palette by the US Geological Survey to highlight certain features.

Siberian Ribbons - June 15th, 2005 - Vivid colors and bizarre shapes come together in an image that could be an abstract work of art or an illustration for a fantasy story. This labyrinth of exotic features is present along the edge of Russia’s Chaunskaya Bay (vivid blue half circle) in northeastern Siberia. Two major rivers, the Chaun and Palyavaam, flow into the bay, which in turn opens into the Arctic Ocean. Ribbon lakes and bogs are present throughout the area, created by depressions left by receding glaciers.
Picture: USGS/NASA/Landsat / Rex Features


uncensoredconscience:

fairy-wren:

resplendent quetzal
(photo by cloud forest conservation)

This is so pretty. I want to eat you. :’(

uncensoredconscience:

fairy-wren:

resplendent quetzal

(photo by cloud forest conservation)

This is so pretty. I want to eat you. :’(

(via adropofilm)